Products

Recent Search Terms

Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review



You are a brave adventurer, and your group is on a quest that requires you to venture into Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft. It is the dreaded home of Strahd von Zarovich, an evil and powerful vampire. Do you have what it takes to work together and survive this deathtrap? Be a fighter, rogue, cleric, wizard or ranger. Use your abilities and spells, and work together with your fellow adventurers to defeat Strahd and his minions in this strategy adventure board game.

Castle Ravenloft is a board game based on Dungeons and Dragons (D&D), the original fantasy role-playing game. D&D is a pen-and-paper style of gaming first published in the 1970's that differed from the then popular tabletop war games. A dungeon master designs and facilitates adventures while the other players experience these adventures as a group of fighters, mages, rogues and a whole host of other character classes. What made the game special was that there were rules to facilitate combat as well as non-combat encounters, bringing the 'adventure' to the gaming table. The players actually lived and breathed their characters that grew over time.

More specifically, the characters and setting in the Castle Ravenloft board game is based on D&D's Ravenloft adventure module that revolves around Strahd von Zarovich, an evil vampire who pines for a lost love. This module and its setting has been so popular that it spawned a few D&D campaigns and worlds, a series of computer games, and now a board game as well. The board game uses the encounter rules from D&D 4th Edition, the 4th iteration of the D&D rulesets and manuals. This version of D&D focuses more on character placement on grids and tiles, making it more like a tabletop miniature game and very suitable to be turned into a board game.

The story and setting of the board game revolve around the vampire Strahd and his home in Castle Ravenloft. The players take on the role of a group of adventurers entering the castle with the ultimate goal of killing Strahd. However, there are many scenarios that you play through before getting to meet the dreaded vampire, each of which can take around an hour or more to complete. Your newly-formed party might start your adventuring career by recovering magical treasure from the castle dungeons, then working your way up to killing a cunning goblin sorcerer, then a dragon, then Strahd himself. Each scenario will have its own special rules and goals, with end bosses and other monsters you must fight.

]]>
In the D&D role-playing game, there is a player who has to take on the role of dungeon master and control the monsters, dungeon design and how the adventure progresses. In Castle Ravenloft, this is not necessary and everyone is able to play as part of the adventuring team. This is possible via an interesting mechanic where things pop up pretty much randomly.

During each player's turn, they have a choice of exploring a new room in the dungeon. This is done by taking a random tile from a draw deck and placing it on an unexplored edge of the map. This may reveal a new monster (again drawn randomly from a deck) and an encounter effect (you guessed it: randomly from a deck). These encounter effects cover everything from traps that you stumble on, to events such as a goblin seeing your group and running off to get help. In effect, the map and the flavor of the dungeon are able to grow organically without the need for someone to control them.

The dungeon isn't the main focus of the game though. It's an adventure game, and the focus is you (or the characters you play, to be more accurate). There are 5 characters you can play: fighter, rogue, ranger, wizard, cleric. Each character has their own unique powers and flavor. The fighter is a close-range melee defender whose job is to protect the rest of the party. The rogue is a close-range melee striker who uses daggers to devastating effect. The ranger attacks her enemies from afar using her bow. The wizard uses arcane magic to damage and control the enemy, while the cleric uses divine magic to protect and heal the party. Whichever class you decide to play, you will be able to customize their powers to create your ideal character.

Whenever there are monsters to fight (which is almost always), the player characters and monsters are represented using miniatures on a grid map composed of the random map tiles. D&D 4th Edition rules are used for these encounters. The rules aren't very complex, and basically dictate what actions, attacks and moves you can make each turn. Most of the time, dice are rolled to see if your attacks hit and how much damage they do. Your objective during these encounters is pretty straightforward: kill the monsters and claim their treasure! After a few of these encounters, your character may even increase in level, earning you higher stats and more powers to use.

Castle Ravenloft is an exciting adventure game that also includes a fair amount of tactical maneuvering. You will feel a sense of achievement as your party slowly works its way from the easy treasure-hunting scenarios to the final scenario where you face off against Strahd. However, you don't have to worry that the game does not have replay value. Due to how the dungeons and events are set up so randomly, no two games will ever be the same.

Castle Ravenloft is a fun game for players who like cooperative games or wish to immerse themselves in a high-fantasy adventure. It can also be used as a way to try out D&D and see if you will like playing the actual D&D role-playing game. You will enjoy Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft if you like dungeon-crawl adventure games like Heroquest or cooperative games such as Battlestar Galactica.

Complexity:  3.0/5.0  
Playing Time:  ~ 1 hour
Number of Players:  1 to 5 players

You can read more about Castle Ravenloft at http://boardgames.gamepudding.com/r/castle-ravenloft.html

Steven maintains the board game review website at http://boardgames.gamepudding.com/ - a website devoted to the best and latest board and card games. Read reviews, game descriptions, related information and more.


Question by traveling153: Please explain weapons damage on an old Dungeons & Dragons computer game? For example, what does 2D4+6 mean? And how would 2D4+6 differ from, for example,1D6+8. The game I am playing is Pool of Radiance (a DOS based game) and I think it uses AD&D rules.

Answer by gambit0614
Gosh this is sad because it will show what a geek I am since I know your answer. The 2d4 means 2 four sided dice and the +6 means whatever that roll of the dice is, there is 6 added to it. The 1d6 means one 6 sided dice and the +8 means 8 is added to that roll. Which is better would really depend on the rolls you get. I would think the first would generally be higher since you would be rolling with two dice instead of one.


Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: This is... Dungeons and Dragons: Daggerdale

Fragger and Jack check out the new dungeon crawling Arcade title: Dungeons and Dragons: Daggerdale.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale

96e3c Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game 51 qLy2BRGPL. SL160  Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
  • Solo and Co-op Play - Battle through the mines of Tethyamar and tower of Rezlus solo or with 1-3 of your friends
  • Questing - Combines both exploration and combat including a reward system for player progression
  • Immersive Combat - Battle a wide range of enemies by engaging in intuitive pick-up-and-play melee, tactical ranged combat, or powerful spell casting
  • Character Development - Select a class, build your ultimate hero, collect loot, and earn experience; select feats, powers, and skills to enhance and customize your hero as you level up
  • Multiple Game Modes - Unlock new areas and challenges in Campaign mode, or hone your skills in Freeplay
Dungeons & Dragons Daggerdale centers on the desperate struggle to defeat the evil Rezlus and his Zhentarim in their attempt to invade and conquer the Dalelands. Dungeons & Dragons Daggerdale is an engaging multi-player experience that introduces a riveting narrative and treacherous new characters. You are charged with the task of restoring order to the Dalelands by unlocking the secrets of the Mines of Tethyamar, defeating the evil within the treacherous Tower of the Void, leading to the final confrontation with Rezlus himself.

Stunning Levels and Exploration - Take on a variety of perilous quests and explore the richly detailed environments of Daggerdale Intuitive pick-up-and-play - Easy to learn, with great depth for those who wish to master Multiple Game Modes - Unlock new areas and challenges in Campaign mode, or hone your skills in Freeplay

Dungeons & Dragons Daggerdale is multiplayer Action Role-playing (RPG) game set within an authentic D&D gameworld that will thrill new and more experienced players alike. In this world players must unite as they quest to stop Rezlus and his Zhentarim from invading and conquering the Dalelands. Game features include: multiple ways to play, including single player support and co-op both in local and online play; pick-up-and-play style gameplay; multiple game modes; and deep character development.

96e3c Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.logo.200 Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review

Story

Travel to the Forgotten Realms, where the adventure begins in the Dalelands, nestled in the remote Desertsmouth Mountains. From the sulfuric catacombs of the mines of Tethyamar, to the dizzying heights of the Tower of the Void, Dungeons & Dragons Daggerdale combines the depth of Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition with intuitive, action packed combat that will satisfy the most seasoned of adventurers. With compelling hack-and-slash gameplay, fluid graphics, and a choice of play modes, Dungeons & Dragons Daggerdale offers an accessible, thrilling, and unmatched RPG experience.

96e3c Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.01.sm Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
Draw your sword, notch an arrow, ready a spell and heft your axe as you quest into the Forgotten Realms.
View larger.

Gameplay

Select an in-game race, character class and gender and set off to build your ultimate hero, questing, collecting loot and earning experience points at every turn. As part of this you can select feats, powers, and skills to enhance and customize your hero as you level up. The focus is on pick-up-and-play style action, so players within a quest group can coexist - with new players picking up the game quickly, and more advanced players delving deeper into the feature set. The game features single player and multiplayer modes, as well as four-player co-op support online, and two-player support locally with split-screen functionality.

Key Game Features

  • Solo and Co-op Play - Battle through the mines of Tethyamar and tower of Rezlus solo or with 1-3 of your friends.
  • Questing - Combines both exploration and combat including a reward system for player progression.
  • Immersive Combat - Battle a wide range of enemies by engaging in intuitive pick-up-and-play melee, tactical ranged combat, or powerful spell casting.
  • Character Development - Select a class, build your ultimate hero, collect loot, and earn experience. Select feats, powers, and skills to enhance and customize your hero as you level up.
  • Stunning Levels and Exploration - Take on a variety of perilous quests and explore the richly detailed environments of Daggerdale.
  • Intuitive Pick-up-and-play - Easy to learn, with great depth for those who wish to master.
  • Multiple Game Modes - Unlock new areas and challenges in Campaign mode, or hone your skills in Freeplay.
  • Authentic D&D Experience - The detailed world of the iconic Dungeons & Dragons franchise has been painstakingly recreated for a rich, complex, and thrilling game experience

Additional Screenshots

96e3c Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.02.sm Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
Immersive combat.
View larger.
96e3c Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.03.sm Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
Single player & co-op options.
View larger.
7c4bd Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.04.sm Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
Deep levels and exploration.
View larger.
7c4bd Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game B002I0JLEQ.05.sm Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
Multiple game modes.
View larger.

buynow small Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
List Price: $ 14.99 Price: $ 12.99

Legend of Drizzt: A Dungeons & Dragons Board Game (4th Edition D&D)

7c4bd Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game 6123CHPvSwL. SL160  Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
  • 42 plastic heroes and monters
  • 13 sheets of interlocking dungeon tiles
  • 200 encounter and treasure cards
  • Rulebook and scenario books
  • 20-sided die
The adventures of Drizzt Do'Urden, as told in the New York Times best-selling Forgotten Realms® novels by R.A. Salvatore, come to life in this thrilling board game. Take on the role of the legendary drow ranger or one of his famous adventuring companions, battle fearsome foes, and win treasure and glory.

Designed for 1-5 players, this board game features multiple scenarios, challenging quests, and cooperative game play. The contents of this game can also be combined with other D&D® Adventure System Cooperative Play board games, including Castle Ravenloft™ and Wrath of Ashardalon™, to create an even more exciting experience.

Components:
 42 plastic heroes and monsters
 13 sheets of interlocking cardstock dungeon tiles
 200 encounter and treasure cards
 Rulebook
 Scenario book
 20-sided die

buynow small Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
List Price: $ 64.99 Price: $ 64.99

Dungeon Siege III

7c4bd Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game 51NIWE9HE8L. SL160  Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
  • For the first time, play DUNGEON SIEGE on high-def consoles
  • Players will be able to adventure by themselves or with friends in co-op multiplayer
  • Uncover a deep story that only Square Enix and Obsidian Entertainment can deliver
  • Pick from unique and highly customizable character classes with a wide range of abilities to choose from;
  • Players will have weighty decisions to make that will impact their alliances, enemies and the culmination of the story
Torn asunder, the delicate balance of power between the kingdom of Ehb's powerful factions has fallen apart. As one of the few remaining members of the disgraced protectors of the land, the 10th Legion, it is up to you to rebuild the once great Legion and stop Ehb from falling into darkness. Joined by a group of unique companions, you will travel through the striking land of Ehb defeating all manner of villains and beasts through a combination of heroic abilities, screen shaking magic and pure cunning. DUNGEON SIEGE 3 seamlessly blends intuitive action gameplay, a robust RPG system featuring a large selection of abilities, an extensive multiplayer component and the depth of story Square Enix and Obsidian Entertainment are known for creating.

buynow small Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
List Price: $ 39.99 Price: $ 23.99

Dungeon Siege 2: Broken World Expansion Pack

7c4bd Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game 41x w S5G6L. SL160  Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
  • Players choose battle comrades to build a party of up to six members; parties can be honed over time using an all-new character development system
  • Each class now has access to unique Heroic Powers that are capable of turning the tide of battle
  • Players can now choose from a number of exotic creatures with special abilities that adventure and grow alongside players
  • The new SFX engine in "Dungeon Siege II" takes visual special effects to the next level
  • "Dungeon Siege II" introduces a new Flick authoring system providing a new level of in-engine cinematic storytelling
An Action-Packed Expansion RPG from Chris TaylorProduct Information[Requires Full Version of Dungeon Siege II to Play]In Dungeon Siege II you destroyed Valdis...and unleashed an unspeakableabomination that has waited 1000 years for its freedom.  As darknessdescends upon the land fiends such as Bound Elves familiars and othermonstrosities destroy any who stand against them.  You must wage waragainst a host of horrors in a last desperate bid to save Aranna...and yourselfin Dungeon Siege II: Broken World!Summon crippling blood spells that literally tear the blood from your foes ormake use of Fist of Stone magic to pummel and incapacitate your enemies. Rejoin your valiant companions from Dungeon Siege II or continue the adventurewith powerful new allies.  Two new playable classes the Blood Assassin andFist of Stone elevate the gameplay to staggering heights.The path of redemption leads through a broken world.Product Features Up to 15 hours of new gameplay that marks the breathtaking conclusion of Aranna's Second Age. Newly enhance tactical combat turns every encounter into a struggle for survival. By popular demand play as a mighty Dwarf! Import all of the new character classes into Dungeon Siege II and relive the adventure.Windows RequirementsRequires full version of Dungeons Siege II to play Windows XP SP 1 1.8 MHz or greater processor 512 MB of RAM 1.4 GB free Hard Drive space 4X CD-ROM drive or higher ATI Radeon 7500 or better Nvidia GeForce 5750 or better Intel Extreme Graphics 82845 82865 82915 Video Card (ATI Radeon 7000 series and the Intel Extreme Graphics 82845 82865 82915 require 2.0 GHz equivalent or higher processor. Mouse Speakers or Headphones Online / Multiplayer:  Broadband Internet access or LAN for online/multiplayer (Broadband Internet access required for online play.  Online/multiplayer requirements are

buynow small Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
List Price: $ 29.99 Price: $ 3.99

Dungeons & Dragons Heroscape Master Set: Battle For The Underdark

7bd89 Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game 51fEqjLaAJL. SL160  Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
  • Build and Battle miniatures game
  • Rule book, 10 figures, 50 terrain pieces and play components
  • Figures fully painted and assembled, ready to play out of the box
  • Figures made of durable plastic built to endure repeated play
  • Everything is fully compatible with other Heroscape figures
Dungeons and Dragons meets Heroscape in the Battle for the Underdark Master Set 3. 10 detailed miniature figures and 50 interlocking pieces are included in this build and battle game system. Unique heroes include Tandros Kreel of Einar, Erevan Sunshadow of Jandar, Darrk Ambershard of Aquilla, and Ana Karithon of Einar. Play one of five select games or customize and create your own. Contents of Heroscape - Battle for the Underdark Master Set 3: 2 Dungeon Tiles (24 hex) 3 Dungeon Tiles (7 hex) 2 Dungeon Tiles (3 hex) 2 Dungeon Tiles (2 hex) 2 Dungeon Tiles (1 hex) 3 Rock Tiles (7 hex) 2 Rock Tiles (3 hex) 1 Rock Tile (2 hex) 1 Rock Tile (1 hex) 3 Sand Tiles (7 hex) 1 Sand Tile (2 hex) 1 Sand Tile (1 hex) 1 Grass Tile (3 hex) 1 Grass Tile (2 hex) 1 Grass Tile (1 hex) 12 Water Tiles (1 hex) 8 Shadow Tiles (1 hex) 1 Rock Outcrop and Base (3 hex) 3 Rock Outcrops and Bases (1 hex) 10 Painted Figures 8 Army Cards 4 Treasure Glyphs 23 Wound Markers 8 Order Markers 8 Combat Dice 1 20-Sided Die 1 Rulebook.

buynow small Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review
List Price: $ 44.99 Price: $ 44.99

25 comments to Dungeon And Dragon Computer Game: Dungeons & Dragons: Castle Ravenloft Board Game Review

  • ryankneale

    2D4+6 = 2 times a 4 sided die + 6
    1D6+8 = 1 times a 6 sided die +8

    I was such a geek in highschool

  • MagicianTrent

    So, for 2D4+6:
    Minimum: 8
    Maximum: 14
    Average: 11

    and 1D6+8:
    Minimum: 9
    Maximum: 14
    Average: 11.5

    Since 2D4+6 is rolling more dice, you’ll get more consistent damage (near the average), while 1D6+8 will vary a lot more (but in this particular example, gives slightly better overall damage).

  • McFlippyhoo

    @jacktheripperrules No he means actually playing with, look at 1:33 and you see ‘Lt Ultima’ which is Michael’s gamertag

  • jacktheripperrules

    @JesustronV2 um thats jack he was playing with jack not michael

  • JesustronV2

    Hey, he was playing with Michael from Rage Quit

  • b1tPanther

    spoilers on the secret achievement. now i remember why i unsubbed

  • ZedekOfLP101

    @1234DKETGIF4321 lol you unoriginal bro? Nah, educate yourself about everything you possibly can. Your knowledge level and language skills mirror that of a first grader. Peace, baddie.

  • 1234DKETGIF4321

    @ZedekOfLP101 lol you mad bro? educating myself about D&D??? I got better things to do then read a D&D book… you obviously are a no lifer, go watch farador, its a parody of you, and I couldnt care less about class of D&D, I dont play it… and your opinion doesnt dictate how everyone think, you know… individuality? having different opinion? obviously not… Irony at his best “go educate yourself, about everything” lol you lack sense pal

  • ZedekOfLP101

    @1234DKETGIF4321 My god you don’t know shit about RPGs. Archers are a ranged DPS class, not a stealth class like a Rogue. Go Google the difference between a Ranger and a Rogue. The Archer is equivalent to the Ranger in the way a Thief is equivalent to a Rogue. Rooster Teeth ARE noobs because they do nothing but play shitty console games. Consoles are casual gaming machines for casual gamers and are nothing compared to PCs and PC gamers. Go educate yourself, about everything, scrub.

  • 1234DKETGIF4321

    @ZedekOfLP101 read my comment, its a review for achievement mostly, not for the game pal, and if your so upset, then do something about it, start to make review of game, ill certainly would have watch it if you had made a review about this game, rather than ranting that rooster teeth are “noob” (wich they arent) and your obviously too much into D&D to even get your butt out of it to check other games, Archer are consider as the stealth one in many games, you should watch Farador….

  • ZedekOfLP101

    @1234DKETGIF4321 Wrong. Archers don’t do stealth nor do they exist as a class in the D&D universe. The closest thing to an Archer in D&D is a Ranger and they don’t do stealth either. It’s common sense, for an intelligent individual at least, to only argue on behalf of things you possess knowledge for. When a banker argues with a plumber about banking it’s obvious which party knows what they’re talking about on behalf of that subject. You’re just as wrong as these Rooster Teeth console noobs are.

  • 1234DKETGIF4321

    @ZedekOfLP101 its the same thing pal… your just raging for no reason, everybody can figure out a fighter will fight hand to hand, a mage will do magic, an archer is the stealth one, and they certainly WILL continue to review games, just cause you dont like it doesnt mean shit to them, do review then? coz other than Rooster Teeth I could only find Spooky doing a review of it and it was a pretty bad video… and its a review for achievement mostly, not for the game….

  • calibeast80

    i live the game its amazing and fun but i have to say that it has some problems there are many little glitches that can cause u to do worse in gameplay and it also very laggy if your not host

  • mikael0222

    Hello. If you started reading this, dont stop or else. I hate people who post these kind of comments but…. Post this? to 16 videos in 30 minutes and promise your? self to? never listen to one of these comments or make? one up. But this one is real. If you dont post this, a boy? with no head or legs will? show? up in your room at midnight and kill you. Everyone will forget you. Start posting. The timer will start as soon? as you finish reading this Sorry i had to do this

  • ZedekOfLP101

    @RoosterTeeth Holy shit did you ever get the class names wrong. Fighter, not Warrior. Wizard, not Mage. At least you got Cleric right, but jesus christ, ARCHER? Really? Fucking ARCHER? It’s Rogue, not Archer. Rogues are not primarily archers by any stretch of the imagination. Rangers, on the other hand, are. Please do not “review” things you have no experience with.

  • J. Givens "There are many here among us who b...
    80 of 81 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Many barrels have died to bring us this information…, May 28, 2011
    Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale (DVD-ROM)

    OK, where to begin… Here’s some background on me. I’m a D&D junky. I love D&D, and I have since I was a kid. I don’t play the RPG stuff much anymore, but I read some of the source material and a lot of the fiction books. I also rush out and buy the PC games when they come out. When I heard about this one, it was no different. I did think to myself, “Why is this game only $15?” Now I know… :)

    I’m probably being too generous giving this game 3 out of 5 stars. I haven’t finished the game, but I can’t imagine the game will be much different after having played it for 4 hours. The game isn’t a total waste of time and money – especially considering it was priced right for what you get out of it. But while there is SOME fun to be had, there’s a lot of frustration, too.

    THE GOOD:
    The graphics aren’t too bad, although they won’t stand up to any AAA title of today. In fact, I kind of liked them. The character models look pretty good, and so far there seems to be a fair amount of variation of the characters – e.g. there are a number of different dwarfs roaming their halls in one part of the game. While not top of the line, for a $15 dollar game, they look OK. The textures aren’t bad either. There’s enough variety – so far – that I’m not too bored looking at the scenery as I play the game. The level design is better than some games I’ve seen. The game takes place below ground, so it’s a throwback to dungeon crawlers of the past. It’s actually a lot of fun to play a D&D game that isn’t so focused above ground for a change. I guess they were trying – maybe??? – to capture the fun of games like Dungeon Hack, an old DOS D&D game. The story seems to be fairly decent too, but as I mentioned, I haven’t gotten that far into the game. So I’ll skip that part in this review.

    The weapons, armor, and items you can find and/or purchase in the game are pretty neat. Some might say they are a little over the top and too powerful too soon for such low level characters, but for a short hack-and-slash game, I don’t see a problem with it. You really need some powerful weapons to offset the number of enemies that come at you if you play it in the single player mode.

    The music is pretty cool. It suits the game quite well, and it’s one of the high points of the game – a game that sadly has too few.

    There are some scripted in-game cutscenes, as well as some animated drawings with voice over that serve as cutscenes, too. The scripted in-game cutscenes are actually pretty good. There are also some scripted events that happen during the quests that add some flavor to otherwise boring quests where you fetch things.

    THE BAD:
    There are some balancing issues. Enemies re-spawn, and if you are low on health and without potions, you’ll have a hard time getting back to safety to end your question. This is a real problem when it comes to the save system (more on that later!!!).

    Limiting your ability to choose between four races that are tied to four classes is not, as the box quotes, “‘the way Dungeons & Dragons was always meant to be played’ – GamePro”. The person that said that needs to be beaten with a pillowcase full of hard drives! [JOKING!!!!] You are basically given 4 choices. Not 16 (4×4) choices as in a mix of classes and races. You get four. They’re bound together. You really don’t create a character. The RPG aspects are pretty much stripped out of the game. When that goes, so does D&D. It makes about as much sense as the Ravenloft fighting game that came out back in the 90s. D&D is an RPG. When you limit what you can do to the extent this game does, not only is it NOT “the way Dungeons & Dragons was always meant to be played”, it’s not much of an RPG at all. There are plenty of RPG games to play, and people aren’t going to spend much time on a game like this. Which begs the question, “Why make it?” If you aren’t going to put out a competitive product, don’t even start the process.

    The story line and gameplay are very linear. This is another issue. With games like the Elderscroll series and NWN, and even Baldur’s Gate, people don’t want such linear gameplay anymore. Being dragged by the nose through a game, without any side quests or deviation, just isn’t going to cut it today. This game has no choice. You follow quest A to quest B to quest C, with no side quests or plots. I assume you just connect the dots, so to speak, to the end of the game.

    The ads for this game are so misleading. The worst claims are that they game includes an “Authentic D&D Experience” and “Character Development.” Read the product description, play the game, and then go back and read it again. You’ll see what I mean.

    THE UGLY:
    The save game system is one of the worst I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been PC gaming since 1995. It’s bad by any standard. It’s bad for a console…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Chris
    21 of 22 people found the following review helpful:
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    An embarrassing product from Wizards of the Coast and Atari, May 30, 2011
    By 
    Chris (Springfield, VA, United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale (DVD-ROM)

    The description of the game is very true. It is true to the basic “red box” D&D that I grew up with. Simple quests, hack and slash, plus the mandatory dragon thrown into the mix.

    For $15.00 I wasn’t expecting much and that’s what I got. I wouldn’t have purchased this game, if I knew how linear and bad the game play was. I felt as if I was testing out the game in Beta. The graphics are subpar, even for a $15 game. As is the documentation. The “alias” buttons are limited and you end up with more skills to use, then buttons.

    The story line is really well developed, but I disliked the interaction with any NPC – I felt as if I was playing the Sims with their “hrmm, hughh” sounds. The music is wonderful and probably the best part of the game.

    The ending is a bit clunky and it took me several hours to figure it out. There is no way to know what you have to do, but mash buttons as they appear on the screen. Plush the buttons appear all over the place and this makes it harder, since you have a limited amount of time to mash the button, if you don’t get it – you die and need to start over. But here is the kicker, mashing the buttons isn’t what you are suppose to do – you need to “climb” but there is no way to know that… I found out because I mashed a movement key and saw my toon move up.

    I’m disappointed by this game – it felt like I was playing Might and Magic back in the 90s.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Tom
    19 of 20 people found the following review helpful:
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    I wish I’d listened to the bad press…, June 3, 2011
    By 
    Tom

    Fun:1.0 out of 5 stars 
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale (DVD-ROM)

    OK, I’m a sucker for dungeon crawls, but this game was just … terrible.

    Poor graphics, one of the longest and most tedious setup/downloads for a game I’ve ever experienced (be prepared to set up a Steam online account if you don’t have one already), clunky interface, limited character customizability, cheesy “cutscenes”, almost unbearable NPC interactions (NPCs just growl at you — one must read the subtitles for interpretation), and overall, the game is just boring (unless you like smashing barrels, barrels, and — yes — still more barrels).

    It is really astounding to me that much older games — Dungeon Siege, Guild Wars, etc. — are not only less expensive than this game but also VASTLY superior in almost every way.

    I never much cared for Dungeons and Dragons Online, but next to Daggerdale, Dungeons and Dragons Online is a masterpiece of gaming.

    Sorry if I sound ranty, but I simply cannot believe a game released in 2011 could be this awful. Be smarter than me: listen to the negative reviews and stay away from this mess. I’ve read the other reviews here at Amazon but, seriously, giving this game 2 or 3 stars is far too generous, in my opinion. If the game had been released 15 years ago, then maybe a few stars would be justified, but in 2011? No, just no.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • NeuroSplicer
    130 of 144 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    JUST DO NOT CALL IT A DUNGEON SIEGE…, June 21, 2011
    By 
    NeuroSplicer (Freeside, in geosynchronous orbit) –
    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)
      

    Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeon Siege III (DVD-ROM)

    The original DUNGEON SIEGE was an unforgettable game that one can still greatly enjoy today. Its first sequel, DS2, was not as fun to play as it suffered from a number of issues yet it managed to retain the character of the series. Sadly this is not true for the third installment.

    A VAST SELECTION OF…FOUR PREMADE CHARACTERS
    This is the first thing that hits you. Unlike both previous DS games, DS3 offers only four characters: a Swordmaster (Lucas), a Gunslinger (Katarina), an Archon/Fire Elemental (Anjali) and a Mage (Reinhart). Can you change their gender? No. Can you alter their appearance? No. Can you personalize their stats? Since there are no stats, again: No.
    Choose the Swordmaster and after a while realize that he is exactly that: a Sword-only warrior. No bows, no crossbows, no slings, no range weapons whatsoever! Not only are the classes limited, the abilities available to each one of them are severely restricted as well!
    Now, when in a cRPG, I cannot identify with female heroes so the fact that in DS3 I cannot play a male gunslinger was major drawback. Such character restrictions are not only a major divergence from the DS tradition but also a serious flaw for any cRPG.

    KNOW BLIND TYPE, WILL PLAY. OTHERS MAY ONLY TRY
    Reeking of a hasty console port, the controls are a nightmare for the PC. You move with the W and S whereas you turn the camera with the A & D keys. You change your fighting stance with the Q button, you select your abilities with the number keys above whereas you block with the space-bar; you open your inventory with the F(?!) and your character page with the C key; and you need to keep hitting the E key every time you want to pick up or interact with something (more on this later). Did I mention the mouse so far? No. Since consoles cannot use a mouse, when it is eventually used (to attack) it feels like an…afterthought.
    Now, since I always play using the arrow keys and rebind keys around them to every other function, were these settings modifiable there were be no problem – but for some unfathomable reason they are not! Hence, more often than not, two-fingers-typist me kept opening the inventory instead of rotating the camera right or opening doors…
    Dungeon Siege series fans will remember that these are PC games – playable mostly with the mouse. Click on the character icon to open his inventory, click on the ground to move; click on a chest to open it. Since when did DS games require either a full keyboard or a …gamepad!

    PIXEL HUNTING? IN 2011? HONESTLY?
    Approaching a container will pop an icon (an open hand or, quite redundantly in treasure chests, another…treasure chest). However, you cannot click on said icon to open the container. You have to hit E – and in order to do so your hero has to approach and step on the right spot. Now, you did all that, the container opens and the contained item(s) and gold drop on the floor. Can you click on them to pick it up? Strangely no.
    The gold is automatically picked up by walking over it (but not walking by it or even standing on it!). More often than not your companion will even oblige you and pick up (most of) the dropped gold. However, that does not happen for items.
    That makes sense, to avoid stuffing your inventory with items you would not want – until you realize that in order for the pickup-icon to appear over an item you have to, again, reposition your hero juuust right – and THEN you have to hit E once more. So, a game with awkward controls requires you to pixel-hunt to open chests and pick up loot from the floor. Come on, who thought of that one guys?
    And, to add insult to injury, items already explored (say, a note on the floor) do not hide once viewed but remain there to further confuse you.

    IMAGINE NO COMPANIONS…AND NO MULE TOO
    Playing a DS game always meant you would be managing up to 6 companions, at least one of them being a pack animal with a much larger inventory. Selecting and balancing your companions and then equipping them and setting their default spells or attacks was a great part of the fun. In this third installment there is no pack animal and you only get one companion at a time – and not all the time.
    The inventory is much larger now so I can understand why the pack animal could be omitted. And your hero (no matter his class) can transmute loot into gold so that covers a handy ability your party mage would have. However, such transmutation, for some reason, is only offered for some but not all of your unequipped items and can only be accessed by opening the Character(?)…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • William A. W.
    59 of 64 people found the following review helpful:
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Warning This Is Not Dungeon Siege, June 22, 2011
    By 
    William A. W. (Oklahoma City, OK) –

    Fun:2.0 out of 5 stars 
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Dungeon Siege III (DVD-ROM)

    Before I explain why I am giving this game a 1, I will give you the pro’s of the game first.

    1. Good character development
    2. Story Line.

    That is pretty much of all the pro’s I can think of.

    The con’s of the game.

    1. This is not Dungeon Siege! The world is pretty much closed and you follow a predefined path. The world is not open like the other two Dungeon Siege games. It is pretty much linear.
    2. It did not come with a manual. The site I was told I could download the manual, [...] gave me a 403 forbidden error. I even tried at Square Enix’s site and got and error.
    3. My registration for the game worked fine for steam, but my red registration card to register with Square Enix told me it had expired. Amazon delivered this game the day it was released to me.
    4. I don’t like having to use STEAM to play the game. Maybe i should have looked into this before purchase.
    5. No Health Potions, Mana Potions. You just pick up little green or blue floating balls to refill.
    6. You can start with a choice of 4 characters. You can not customize characters at all, or even name them.
    7. The area’s were you can walk are so small some combat is so hard you cant run to get away and fight a few at a time.
    8. The world is dark. Never seems to be bright daylight. As stated above you spend most times in caves, dungeons ect.
    9. I will admit I am not great at combat, but i get caught in small spaces so much I am constantly reloading.
    10. You can only save at certain spots.
    11. Although I have not beaten the game yet, it seems that a lot of people are finishing it in about 12-16 hours.
    12. For the price they charged for this game, the content could have been a lot better. Instead they plan to make you purchase more content.

    With that being said, If you don’t look at this game as a “Dungeon Siege Game” maybe you will like it. I am sorely disappointed, I will try to finish the game simply so I haven’t wasted my money.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Timothy H. Kepple "Lover of the esoteric"
    72 of 80 people found the following review helpful:
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Do not waste your money upon this game, June 21, 2011
    By 
    Timothy H. Kepple “Lover of the esoteric” (Lander, WY United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Fun:1.0 out of 5 stars 
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Dungeon Siege III (DVD-ROM)

    When I buy a PC game, I expect a PC game … not a console game with the letters P and C slapped on it. If I want to play a game for a console, I’ll buy a console- they’re completely different gaming mechanisms.

    I’ve been looking forward to this game since it was announced; I pre-ordered it as soon as it was available on Amazon, based solely upon the continuation of the Dungeon Siege franchise; Dungeon Siege 1 is in my list of top-ten favorite computer games.

    I’m disappointed that this appears to be yet another game that builds its fanbase upon PC users, then panders to the lowest common denominator of consoles.

    I don’t want to play a console game on my PC. If I did, I’d buy a CONSOLE. I don’t want to have checkpoints; I don’t want to have to play with a controller. I DO NOT HAVE A CONSOLE IN FRONT OF ME; I HAVE A PC.

    I’m tired of my game experience being limited to what an aging console is capable of accomplishing.

    I went into this game with an open mind, hoping I’d enjoy the experience. I spent the weekend playing through DS1 in anticipation. This did not happen.

    I can choose from … four characters. I can’t even pick a name. I can’t customize them. I can’t even tell what they are. My friend and I lasted 15 minutes in multiplayer before I shut the game off because I had motion sickness to the point I felt like vomiting. It’s bad enough that both characters have to be on screen at the same time (On a PC?!) But when the other player moves, it move MY camera. Even when I’m trying to stand still and maneuver close enough to something that I can use the freakin’ “action key” teh screen is swaying and churning like a boat at sea.

    The viewing angle is already exceedingly awkward. If at my native resolution of 1920×1080, when zoomed out as far as possible, I felt like I was playing on an 800×600 screen.

    Save points? Again- I AM NOT ON A CONSOLE. I have an ENTIRE 500GB hard drive for nothing but games. Save away! I don’t mind!

    The game automatically activates your microphone if you have one plugged in.

    The music sounds like bad early German ambient electronica at the beginning of the game. So much so, that I’m not sure it was even playing correctly, as it mostly sounded like a collection of random beeps and feedback.

    I’m done with pre-orders before reviews are out. I’m tired of console ports that fail to live up to the PC’s capabilities; I’m equally tired of reviewers glibly accepting this without calling game companies to task.

    And why is the game so … French? I’m in the Kingdom of Ehb, yet everyone sounds like they spent the month in Paris.

    This is NOT Dungeon Siege. This is not even a PC game.

    And why do I need a Steam connection to play at home on my LAN?

    Thank you, Square Enix and Obsidian. I will not pre-order games ever again; I’m tired of being burnt by crap like this.

    EDITED TO ADD:

    One of the biggest problems with computer games is that they are non-returnable. You buy a game, it utterly sucks, and you’re stuck with it. There is no way to get your money back; and therefore, no incentive for game companies to improve their products.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Philly Doc
    10 of 11 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    The fun continues, October 21, 2006
    By 
    Philly Doc (Ohio) –

    Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeon Siege 2: Broken World Expansion Pack (CD-ROM)

    I am really enjoying this game.

    I never finished DS I, I thought it was tedious. DS II fixed the problems of DS I and I played the sequel through to the end. There wasn’t anything about the gameplay compelling enough to make me want to go through it a second time for the extra charactor slot, but it was a REALLY enjoyable H&S while it lasted.

    I haven’t experienced any of the bugs the one reviewer did, my characters imported right away. I’m having fun well into the second act.

    If you enjoyed DS II, you should buy this.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Dr. Kevin P. Lyness
    12 of 15 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    More of the same, which is good, October 1, 2006
    By 
    Dr. Kevin P. Lyness (New Hampshire) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeon Siege 2: Broken World Expansion Pack (CD-ROM)

    This is essentially just a new set of missions, along with two new character classes and a couple of new pets. There are also new item recipes. This extends a pretty fun hack and slash game. You can import parties from the original or start with new characters at the appropriate level. Unlike some expansions, this starts out at a difficulty level appropriate for characters who’ve beaten Valdis. I’m enjoying it.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Dellamorte
    43 of 44 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Interesting direction for HeroScape.., January 18, 2010
    By 

    Durability:4.0 out of 5 stars Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars Educational:3.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeons & Dragons Heroscape Master Set: Battle For The Underdark (Toy)

    I have been playing heroScape since the beginning – I own and use almost every single set and expansion, and recently picked up this new D&D expansion set.

    Honestly, I was not looking forward to this expansion – one of the things I like most about the original game is the simplicity of the play. After a couple of games with this new set, I can definitely say this is a great addition to the core gameplay.

    Aside from a couple of new rules and terrain effects, the major addition is a campaign mode. The included campaign is set up as four “rooms” that connect to make a dungeon. Each room has a condition that must be met before the players can go on to the next, and it is possible to gain and lose characters from the party. The included play scenario is a lot of fun, and I think it will inspire players to come up with campaigns of their own.

    An additional campaign can be downloaded at Playdnd.com, and there is an another exclusive campaign available at Heroscapers.com.

    The detail and paint of the figures are great – they seem like WOTC took existing D&D Miniatures and scaled them to the heroScape system. New terrain includes Shadow Tiles (which give a +1 to defense) Rocks (repainted glaciers) and dungeon tiles. The creatures (such as the feral Troll) are a LOT more difficult to kill, and the new Heroes seem perfectly balanced.

    One of the best new rules in my opinion, is the trap roll for glyphs, and the ability to carry/drop glyphs. Made for some interesting fights.

    This set doesn’t really change the core game play, it just adds a new twist – campaign instead of typical deathmatch or capture the flag. All of the official master rule scenarios have always had victory conditions, but I think this is going to get people more focused on creative ones.

    As a long time player, I was skeptical of WOTC taking this franchise over, but I think they have done a great job with this. My only reservation is that I am concerned they will ultimately try to make this a “collectable” game with blind purchase figures. Let’s hope not – The exclusives were bad enough (although they have rectified this somewhat with the recent expansion – now re-release the flag bearers in a reasonably priced set!!!)

    I Highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys HeroScape and wants to try something new.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • C. Baumgartner
    17 of 18 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    D&D fun for everyone, March 6, 2010
    By 
    C. Baumgartner
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Durability:4.0 out of 5 stars Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars Educational:3.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Dungeons & Dragons Heroscape Master Set: Battle For The Underdark (Toy)

    I recently bought this, and am very happy with it. Being a life long D&D fan, I was looking for something to play with my kids (age 6 and 4). The game has 2 sets of rules (Basic and Advanced). The Basic set is very simple, and my 6 year old had no problem with it. The game is fun, doesn’t take forever, and the pieces look good. I highly recommend this game to anyone.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>